Stones 0f Wonder - orientated standing stones, alignments and cairns in Scotland

Rothiemay, Strath Isla

Rothiemay - a description of the recumbent stone circle at Rothiemay, Strath Isla and its astronomical significance.

Books to Buy


Stones of Wonder
QUICK LINKS ...

HOME PAGE



INTRODUCTION

WATCHING THE SUN, MOON AND STARS

THE MONUMENTS

THE PEOPLE AND THE SKY


BACKGROUND

ARCHAEOASTRONOMY

USING THE SITE DESCRIPTION PAGES

VISITING THE SITES

THE LEY LINE MYSTERY


THE SITES

ARGYLL AND ARRAN

MID AND SOUTH SCOTLAND

NORTH AND NORTH-EAST SCOTLAND

WESTERN ISLES AND MULL


Data

DATES OF EQUINOXES AND SOLSTICES, 1997 to 2030 AD

DATES OF MIDSUMMER AND MIDWINTER FULL MOONS, 1997 to 2030 AD


POSTSCRIPT

Individual Site References

Bibliography

Links to other relevant pages


Contact me at : rpollock456@gmail.com



Recumbent Stone Circle NJ551488*

How to find : This recumbent stone circle is about 0.5km from Milltown of Rothiemay. Take the B9117 going east. Look for a gate on the right, from where the stone circle is visible in the field. The site is also referred to as 'Millton'.

Rothiemay recumbent stone circle

Best time of year to visit : Lunar major standstill.

This is a ruined but still recognisable recumbent stone circle, about 28 metres in diameter. The site is in a flat field, and all of the interior ring cairn material has been removed. The massive recumbent stone and a few of the other substantial stones of the circle remain in position.

A visitor will notice immediately the extensive cupmarking on the inner side of the recumbent, which is the most highly decorated of all the recumbent stones. Altogether there are 119 cupmarks on this stone, some of which also have rings around them.

From about the centre of the ring the recumbent stone covers a band of horizon 17° wide, from 197°.9 to 215°.7. A horizon of about one degree in height behind the recumbent gives a declination range from -30°.2 to -25°.3. This means that the southern full moon at the major standstill would set over the stone, on its left side.

It has been suggested that the cupmarks on the stone are a record of each full moon from the major standstill to the minor standstill1. This would have been over a period of 9.3 years and have covered about 115 lunations, which is a fairly good match with the number of cup marks the recumbent stone shows.



Return to North and North-east Scotland index

Return to Stones of Wonder opening page